Solar Power Rocks logo

Solar Power Rocks - Clear info on home solar power rebates, tax credits, and other benefits

Get solar installed for $0 down in Louisiana!

Get quotes from trusted local installers



Privacy Assurance - We will not sell or otherwise transmit your personal information to others without your permission.

2019 Policy Grade

F

Avg. Yearly Savings

$1,349

Congratulations! You've found the ultimate guide to going solar in Louisiana

2019 Policy Grade

F

Avg. Savings/year

$1,349

Your 2019 guide to getting solar panels for your home in Louisiana

This page is a complete guide to the complicated and sometimes confusing process of installing solar panels on your Louisiana home. Since there's a lot to consider, we've separated the page into sections to help you find what you are looking for. If you find this page useful, please share it with someone who might also find it interesting!

red ribbon

** What's new for 2019 **

Over the past few years, solar policy in Louisiana has been a bit stop-and-go. And as of right now, it's full STOP. The state has ended the former solar tax credit that was VERY successful, and net metering is no longer something solar owners can expect. For 2017, we cannot recommend going solar in Louisiana, unless the other benefits of solar ownership are worth thusands of dollars to you.

Questions? Our network of solar experts are on call to assist you. Simply sign up for personalized assistance on our special solar deals page. You can get discounted on-grid pricing as low as $4,000/kW! This is paired with the Louisiana solar incentives you see below.

The Solar Strategy section is focused on the 3 ways of paying for solar in Louisiana, so you can decide which is best for you. We've created a tool that asks you a few questions and recommends whether you should pursue a solar lease, loan, or outright purchase. Then, we provide detailed analysis of how each works.

The Policy Information section contains all our latest research on the rules set by lawmakers and the Public Utilities Commission, which determine how easy it is to go solar in Louisiana. These policies and rules govern everything from renewable energy mandates to interconnection, and have a huge effect on the viability of solar.

Finally, the Solar Incentives section includes information about money-back rebates and grants, tax credits, and tax exemptions for going solar in Louisiana.

Click any of the boxes below to go to that section of the page, or scroll down to read the page in order.

Your Solar Strategy in Louisiana

Figuring out the best way to go solar in Louisiana can be a little daunting. From loans and leases to power-purchase agreements, there are a lot of options out there. To help you pick the one that might be best, we've created the handy decision tool below.

We'll ask you a few simple questions about you and your home. Once you're done, we'll recommend a good option. Further down this page, we provide cost estimates and example return-on-investment calculations for all the various options:

How should you pay for solar?

Use our decision tool to find out!

How to pay for solar panels in Louisiana

The chart above shows the 25-year returns for an investment in solar whether you choose to purchase a system with cash or pay over time with a loan. Before you scroll down, we'll get right to the point: unless you're willing to sink thousands of dollars into solar with little hope of a finacnial return, Louisiana is not a good place to invest in panels for your home.

Read more below about each of three options for solar in Louisiana.

How much can you save with solar?

Find out

Option 1: Paying cash for solar

Paying up front used to be the only way to get panels on your roof, and it's still the option that allows you the most control. But it isn't the best option from a percentage return on investment standpoint—that award goes to the solar loan option.

Still, an outright purchase means you own the system from day one and reap the benefits. You get the 30% Federal solar tax credit and electricity savings to bring your first-year costs way down. The trouble is, in Louisiana, these benefits are environmental; not financial.

In our example, you put down $20,000, but by the end of year 1, incentives and energy savings will erase a bunch of it. Over 25 years, your system will have produced more than $5,200 in income. But that late income makes the system not worth its cost, compared to an alternative investment. Check out the NPV:

Net Present Value: -$4,129

Net Present Value (NPV) measures how good of an investment something is, compared to the best alternative. We use a 6% return to evaluate all solar investments, and Louisiana's -$4,129 NPV on a 5-kW solar system means you'd be that much better off investing your money in stocks over 25 years than solar. Electricity is just so cheap in Louisiana right now, a solar system for you home isn't a good investment unless the environmental benefits are worth at least $4,129 to you.

Here’s how the numbers work for a Louisiana solar purchase of a 5-kW rooftop solar system:

  • Installing a typical 5-kW solar system should start at about $20,000.
  • The Feds calculate their 30% tax credit based on actual out of pocket costs, so you'll get $6,000 back as a tax credit, for a new price (after year 1) of $14,000. Note: you can take the credit over as many years as necessary if you don't owe $6,000 in Federal taxes this year.
  • Next, you'll subtract your first-year energy savings, which will add up to about $544, bringing your cost after the first year to $13,456. Those savings will continue for the life of your system, and will only get bigger over time, considering that utility companies raise their rates 3.5% annually on average.
  • By the time your system pays itself back in year 20, you’ll be seeing over $900 per year in savings until the end of your 25-year warranty.
  • When all is said and done, our estimate shows a total net profit of $5,261, with an internal rate of return of 2.5%. That's not even half as good as a 25-year investment in the stock market, which means solar isn't the best investment option—but it is a way to make a little money while doing good for the environment.
  • On top of those returns, your home's value just increased by just about $14,000, too (your expected annual electricity savings over 20 years)!
  • And speaking of doing good for the environment... your system will create some green for the earth by not using electricity from fossil-fuels. In fact, the energy you’re not using has the carbon equivalent of planting 101 trees a year, every year your solar power system is humming.
Keep in mind, the numbers above are based on an average home in Louisiana. If you're ready for a custom quote for a solar panel system, our network of experts are on call to assist you. Simply sign up for personalized assistance on our special solar deals page.

Option 2: Using a loan to pay for solar

Usually, this is where we tell you that taking a loan for solar panels is a no-brainer, because it means investing in an income-generating asset. And technically, that's true in Louisiana, too. It's just not a sure-thing like it is in other states, because Louisiana has some of the lowest electricity prices in the nation, and the savings aren't as great.

As you can see from the chart above, you'll start out with a big windfall, because with a loan, you're not putting any money down, and you get the Federal 30% tax credit for the whole installed cost of your system. Then, over the 15-year repayment term of your loan, you'll be spending more than you're saving in electricity costs, to the tune of about $1,000 per year until you pay the loan off.

After that, you'll save over $800 per year in electricity costs from your paid-for solar panels, but by the end of the system's 25-year warranty, you still won't have broken even. That means a solar investment like this in Louisiana will cost rather than save you money over the long term.

Net Present Value: -$2,503

Net Present Value (NPV) measures how good of an investment something is, compared to the best alternative. We use a 6% return to evaluate all solar investments, and Louisiana's -$2,503 NPV on a solar loan means you'd be that much better off investing your money in stocks over 25 years than solar. We believe in the environmental benefits of solar, but $2,503 is a lot of money to pay for something that usually saves you money over the long term.

Here’s how the numbers pencil out for a Louisiana solar purchase with a solar loan:

  • Installing a typical 5-kW solar system should start at about $20,000. That's how big your loan will need to be to cover it.
  • The electricity you'll save in the first year of operation would have cost $544, but your loan payments will total $1,775, for a difference of $1,231, or about $102 per month.
  • That's not so bad when you consider your tax savings for the year will be $6,000! You'll come out nearly $4,800 ahead in year 1, which should help ease the burden of loan payments for a few years, at least.
  • When your loan’s paid off after year 15, you’ll start see over $800 year in savings until the end of your system’s life.
  • Still, at the end of your 25-year panel warranty, you'll be in the hole about $1,400. That's not a huge amount of money, but considering what you could have made from an alternative investment, it ain't pretty.
  • If you decide the cost is worth it, the environmental benefits might make you smile a little. Operating your system will take as much carbon out of the air as planting 101 trees every year!
Keep in mind, the numbers above are based on an average home in Louisiana. If you're ready for a custom quote for a solar loan, our network of experts are on call to assist you. Simply sign up for personalized assistance on our special solar deals page.

Option 3: Buying the electricity, not the panels with a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA)

Louisiana does not offer solar Power Purchase Agreements or leases. Perhaps it would be a good idea to contact a solar advocacy organization and ask them to fight for solar in your state!

How much can you save with solar?

Find out

Louisiana Solar Policy Information

Ever wonder why solar seems to be everywhere in some states, but not in others? We did too.

State legislatures and public utilities commissions can enact rules to make solar power accessible for everyone. Favorable rules explain why some of the cloudiest states—New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, are doing so well with solar, and yet some of those with the most natural solar resources—like Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia—are doing so poorly.

Below is important information about the public policy, rules, and economic reasons that affect your ability to go solar here in Louisiana:

Louisiana's Renewable Portfolio Standard

None

Grade: F

Louisiana's Renewable Portfolio Standard grade

A Renewables Portfolio Standard (“RPS”) requires utilities in the state to eventually source at least a certain percentage of their electricity from clean, renewable sources like solar panels. Typically you can tell how strong a state’s solar incentives are just by looking at the RPS. A strong RPS means strong rebates and other cash incentives. A weak, or worse, no RPS at all generally means little to no incentives for solar power. Fortunately that’s not the case here, thanks to that tax credit we’ll get to in a second. But even still, a strong RPS could help shift some of the cost of incentivizing solar power to the utility companies that are still chugging along on fossil-fuel based power.

An RPS is critical to strong renewable energy policy. Utility companies aren't really all that gung-ho about you producing your own power. After all, it costs them money when you use less of their electricity. They also don’t naturally want to give you big payments for energy you're feeding back into the grid. The main reason the utilities are aiding the transition to lower electric bills and offering incentives to put solar on roofs is because the state forces them to. Without an RPS, Louisiana is missing opportunities to help homeowners take advantage of clean, reliable solar power.

Even without a strong RPS, there is still good reason to go solar in LA. Read on to find out why.

Learn more about Renewable Portfolio Standards

Louisiana's RPS solar carve out

None

Grade: F

Louisiana's Solar Carve-out grade

The best states for solar mandate that a certain percentage of the RPS comes directly from solar energy. Without a mandatory RPS in Louisiana, this is another area that falls short. If an RPS contains specific carve-outs for clean and efficient technologies like solar panels, or mandates for the environmentally necessary increases in distributed generation, you see even stronger incentives for residential solar power.

Learn more about Solar Carve-outs

Louisiana Electricity Prices

$0.09/kWh

Grade: F

Louisiana's Electricity cost grade

Louisiana pays just 9 cents per kWh for electricity—the cheapest rate in the nation. Cheap electricity rates mean you’re probably not feeling too much of a strain in your pocketbook... yet. Just don’t forget why electricity is so cheap.

Most of our electricity still comes from burning millions of tons of fossil fuels. The cost of those fossil fuels in dollars and cents may be low (for now), but the environmental costs are astronomically high. New regulations on carbon emissions and dwindling supplies will likely drive the cost up over the next few decades. But while everyone else is paying through the nose for the fuels of the past, you’ll be rocking that sweet, shiny solar power system on your roof, and making money! Just remember to thank us.

Find out why electricity prices matter

Louisiana Net Metering

Statewide w/caveats

Grade: D

Louisiana's Net Metering grade

Net Metering requires your utility to monitor how much energy your solar power system produces and how much energy you actually consume, and make sure you get credit for the surplus.

Unfortunately, Louisiana’s net metering rules are kind of a joke. Arbitrary net metering caps here mean new solar owners can only expect to receive half-price for any kilowatt-hours they don't use to power their own home. Until the legislature gets this figured out, the state is a bad, bad place for new home solar.

Learn more about net metering

Louisiana Interconnection Rules

None

Grade: F

Louisiana's Interconnection Standards grade

Louisiana’s net metering law includes basic interconnection requirements, but does not establish any set any actual interconnection rules beyond those basic safety compliance requirements. As a result, there is no standard interconnection process here. The net metering law does not address insurance requirements. Sadly the law does require a redundant external disconnect switch, though many inverter-based systems (as yours almost certainly will be) can qualify for an exemption if other safety shutdown features are in place.

Learn more about solar interconnection rules

Solar Incentives in Louisiana

Next to high electricity prices and net metering, solar incentives have traditionally been the most important factor for whether home solar power makes financial sense in a state. In the past, some states with otherwise lousy policy had tremendous incentives that drove down the up-front cost of going solar so much that homeowners could save oodles of money even without net metering or a good RPS.

These days, the big incentive most people can get is the Federal Solar Tax Credit that earns you 30% of your total system costs back after just 1 year. State incentives play less of a role than in the past, but some really good ones are still out there, ready to help homeowners go solar and save money before you know it.

Let's see how Louisiana measures up:

The availability of state solar incentives for residential solar systems was sourced from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency, utility company websites, and the state public utility commission.

Louisiana Solar Power Rebates

None

Grade: F

Louisiana's Solar Rebates grade

Like we said, this is where you really see the effect of having no RPS here. Without mandatory minimum levels of renewable energy, the utility companies are happy to keep relying on all those fossil fuels so long as the profits keep coming in. If they have no incentives to encourage solar power, the utilities aren’t very motivated to give you any incentives either. That’s why there are no performance payments or utility rebates available here.

Learn more about solar rebates

Louisiana Solar Tax Credits

None

Grade: F

Louisiana's Solar Tax Credits grade

This is where Louisiana used to shine, but no longer. The state once offered huge solar income tax credits that cut people a CHECK for any portion over their tax bill. It made going solar here a really good idea, but the gravy train has been parked in the garage, disassembled, and sold for scrap. No more tax credits mean Louisiana's solar industry is all but dead.

Learn more about state solar tax credits

Louisiana Solar Performance Payments

None

Grade: F

Louisiana's Solar Performance Payments grade

Again, without an RPS, there is little incentive for utility companies to pay a premium for solar. That holds as true in the bayou as it does in the desert.

Learn more about SRECs

Property Tax Exemption

100%

Grade: A

Louisiana's Solar Property Tax Exemptions grade

Louisiana also offers tax exemptions to help make solar power more attractive. You are 100% exempt from all property taxes associated with the increase in home value caused by installing a solar power system. And there is an increase. That’s going to save you a pretty nice chunk of change every year.

Sales Tax Exemption

None

Grade: F

Louisiana's Solar Sales Tax Exemption grade

Unfortunately, there is no sales tax exemption here, meaning you’ll pay an extra 4% up front on the cost of your system.

Learn more about tax exemptions for solar

The consensus on Louisiana solar power rebates and incentives

The Louisiana legislature has provided one excellent way for homeowners to take advantage of the benefits of solar power. It was a forward-thinking move, but without any more formalized laws that require utilities to source their electricity from renewable sources, it’s easy to reverse course on the benefits of the tax credit. If the tax credit were to lapse, Louisiana would be a big “F.” Based on the big picture, we had to give it a “D.”

With that big, big tax credit still rolling, however, Louisiana is a great state for solar for now. Laissez les bon temps rouler!

Again, if you are confused about how these numbers work and would like some personalized assistance or a quote of your own, simply connect with our network of solar experts. They’ll help sort out all the pricing, get you access to special deals, and they’re super friendly to boot!

73
Leave a Reply

avatar
66 Comment threads
7 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
61 Comment authors
MarionBen Zientara Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Marion
Guest
Marion

Can a HOA forbid someone to install solar panels in Louisiana? Is there any type of legal text? Thanks…

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

i t s’ not fair because i own a townhose, I can’t buy solar energy. who do I blame?

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Where are you seeing that the LA State credit will be phased out July 1, 2015?

Ben Zientara
Admin

Not sure what that person is talking about. Louisiana’s tax credit goes through 2017: http://programs.dsireusa.org/system/program/detail/2636

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

you can only get tax credit for either solar panels or solar water you cant get both. You can only get the tax credit once in a lifetime, the louisiana state rebate is 50% on purchases and 28% on leases, the federal is 30% on leases and purchases. The louisiana rebate is being phased out july 1 2015 get

Neal Estay
Guest
Neal Estay

UP Date on my Solar System

It’s been 8 1/2 months now that my system has been operational. I pay 11.00 dollars a month and have over 6,000 KWh banked. I started a savings at the bank and put 160.00 (average for last 12 months) dollars a month into a savings account, right now i have 1,580.00 dollars in that account. Still to me a win..win..situation

Paul Rizzo
Guest
Paul Rizzo

Not sure about solar water, but from my best guess if I control my air conditioner which apparently a incredible energy hog my Received(sun) vs Delivered on my net meter should be favoring me very soon.

It is already paying for itself easily. The lease to own system that solar companies are doing is the real way to make solar viable to the average guy.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Is there any way that I can get both solar electricity and water?

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I’m looking into getting solar panels put on my home, but I’m also interested in getting solar water. Is there any way that I can get both of them?

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Neal Estay I’ve installed a 12.5 kw system on my house 3 months ago. My electric bill for those 3 months has been ZERO. I also banked 1839 KWh since i turned them on for future use. They will with stand winds up to 130 miles an hour. My panels are guareented to produce 97% of thier power for the 1st 13yrs. and 80% up to 30 yrs. and my micro invertors are guareented for 25 yrs…i’ll have my money back in 6 1/2yrs. I’m getting $29,000 back from state and $14,880 back from fed. this year ..i’ll get the… Read more »

shares

Solar Power Rocks is a Wave Solar company

Wave Solar Logo